Hoard Coins.com
On this page you can purchase unsorted individual coins. We have deliberately selected a few higher quality groups of coins from
various categories for those wishing to get coins of finer quality. We have done some basic attribution in order to compile the groups
but most coins can still be researched further. Once attributed they will no doubt be worth more than the purchase price. By not
attributing these coins we can keep our costs down, pass on the savings to the customer and maybe provide you with a hidden gem
that we had not recognised! Photographs show the coins under different lighting angles so you can accurately judge the quality. To
order any coins listed
please email us.
Individual Coins
Umayyad Copper - £3
Unattributed higher grade coins. All of these coins are Umayyad post reform copper coinage and date to 661 to 750 AD. There are
undoubtedly many different rulers and mints in this group of coin and it should be a fun task to try and figure them out. The images
show typical specimens. Many details and legends are clear. These are some of the earliest Islamic coins.

There are a great number of Islamic coinage references available that list the different legends in full allowing comparison to what is on
these coins. We offer a CD-ROM of several old references in our
accessories section that we have found very useful in helping
attribution.
Mamluk Rosettes - £3
These coins are quite unusual. Minted by the Mamluks of
Egypt around in the 14th century they are extremely thick.
The only other coins of equal thickness are some of the
ancient Greek and Ptolemaic Egyptian. The reverse can
contain Islamic script but can also be blank. The obverse
bears a distinct rosette. These coins puzzled researchers for
years and are nice examples of the type.
These neat little coins are very collectible, despite being the lowest denomination of the Roman Empire. They were all coined after
379 AD in one of the last major changes of Roman currency before the decline of the Western Empire. The early Byzantine rulers
continued their use for a short time and some may be included here. Several different emperors and reverse images are evident and
none of these have been attributed, so there may be some gems hidden in here. The images show typical specimens and the quality.
A modern penny is shown for scale and illustrates perfectly the diminutive size of these coins.
Roman Half Centenionalis (Nummus) - £3
Byzantine 'M' Follis - £3
From the Byzantine Empire these are well circulated hoard coins. We find these fascinating coins as even when first minted they
weren't always great quality and the details could be poorly defined. There are also many different types making these a good choice
of coins to collect. None are attributed, we have simply placed them in this group based on the big 'M' on the reverse. Most of these
could probably be attributed to a century or emperor. The condition is fair, but this is typical of religious hoards and does not mean
they are any less collectible and they are priced accordingly.
Byzantine 'K' Half Follis - £3
From the Byzantine Empire these are well circulated hoard coins. We find these fascinating coins as even when first minted they
weren't always great quality and the details could be poorly defined. There are also many different types making these a good choice
of coins to collect. None are attributed, we have simply placed them in this group based on the big 'K' on the reverse. Most of these
could probably be attributed to a century or emperor. The condition is fair, but this is typical of religious hoards and does not mean
they are any less collectible and they are priced accordingly. The K denotes a value half that of the 'M' coins.
Ptolemy Eagle - SOLD OUT
These distinct coins are from the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. They are known for their thickness and weight and date from the 2nd
century B.C. Each of these coins has the eagle with wings spread on the reverse. These coins were in circulation for a long period of
time and shown expected wear. Additionally, they are bronze rather than copper. The images show typical specimens that indicate
the eagle is nicely preserved on each coin. The obverse is more variable in quality. Non of these have been attributed, but we believe
with a quick glance they are Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II.
Ptolemy Ships Prow - SOLD OUT
These distinct coins are from the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. They are known for their thickness and weight and date from the 2nd
century B.C. Each of these coins has the less common ships prow on the reverse. These coins were in circulation for a long period of
time and shown expected wear. Additionally, they are bronze rather than copper so have retained better details. Non of these have
been attributed, but the level of wear may make this difficult. We have tried to show the coins in their best light so you can properly
see the level of detail that remains.
Agrippa I Jewish Barley - £7
Coins issued in the Holy Land are some of our personal favourites as they often have styles and designs different to other coins. The
coins offered here are all the same type, being issued in Jerusalem by Agrippa I in 41-42 A.D. They show three ears of barley on the
reverse and an umbrella on the obverse. These are attributed as Hendin #1244 and they are attractive little copper coins.
Alexander Janneus Jewish Widows Mite - £6
These are perhaps some of the most famous coins in the world as they are mentioned in the bible. These little coins are the famous
Widows mite and were produced in vast quantities to fill the demand for "small change" in the holy land. They were minted under
Alexander Janneus between 103 and 76 B.C. (Hendin group #1150) and are preserved in a vast array of shapes and sizes. Being the
lowest denomination coin they were produced rapidly (often hurriedly) on regular and irregular flans. They were rapidly struck,
trimmed and clipped before being put into circulation with almost no quality control (as evidenced by the fact that rarely are the dies
centred). Still they are fascinating little coins and you can't help but wonder what they were used to purchase over 2000 years ago.
Antiochus IV Serrated Apollo Seated - £7
These interesting coins are from the Seleucid kingdom (part of Alexander the Great's empire). They come from the reign of Antiochus
IV and were minted around 168 B.C. (Spaer # 1108 group). They are typical of small Seleucid coins in that they are serrated, which is
quite an unusual feature. On the obverse is the laureate head of Apollo, while on the reverse is an image of Apollo seated. The
images show typical specimens, all of which show fine details. These are nice coins, and as with all our coins if you wanted to take
the cleaning a step further you could probably really make them come up. Great examples of ancient Greek coinage.
Antiochus IV Serrated Goddess Standing - £7
These interesting coins are also from the Seleucid kingdom. They come from the reign of Antiochus IV and were minted around 168
B.C. (Spaer # 1130 group). They are typical of small Seleucid coins in that they are serrated, which is quite an unusual feature. On
the obverse is the diademed radiate head of Antiochus, while on the reverse is an image of a standing deity. The images show typical
specimens, all of which hace fine details. These are nice coins, and as with all our coins if you wanted to take the cleaning a step
further you could probably really make them come up. Great examples of ancient Greek coinage.
Byzantine Billon Trachea - £6
These highly distinct coins were issued between 1204 and 1261 A.D. by the Latin princes after the armies of the Fourth Crusade
captured Constantinople. Classified as billon coins (a mix of copper and silver) they have a unique cup or saucer shape to them with
religious images of Christ or the Virgin Mary on the reverse and the serving monarch on the reverse. Many are struck on irregular
flans and why they are such a shape is unknown. Collectible and interesting coins from a tumultuous period of the Byzantine empire.
More often than not with these coins only the image in the depression is properly imprinted or preserved, but their unique shape
means that the details are usually nice and crisp.
Roman Higher Grade - £4
These are higher grade Roman coins all picked from a single hoard. Details are crisp and sharp and although some may show
damage overall these are nice coins. Most are going to be from the last couple of centuries of the Western Empire and a number of
different emperors appear. The reverses are also varied as the images show. We pick coins at random from this group to fill your
order so you never know what you might receive. None have been attributed or looked at closely other than to grade them for this
group. The best have not been picked out for sale elsewhere. This quality of coin is typical of only the top 10% of any given hoard.
The coins are photographed in natural and artificial light so you can clearly see the fine details of the coins.
These higher grade coins all came from a single hoard and are almost exclusively from Antiochus III, a Seleucid king that ruled from
223-187 B.C. Being from a hoard they do show signs of wear but the busts and reverse images are generally quite clear. The reverse
image shows Apollo standing with his bow behind him. These are nice small coins measuring about half the size of a modern penny.
Considering they are well over 2000 years old they are great examples of pocket change from the ancient Greeks.
Greek Seleucid Antiochus III - £6
Order 10 coins or more from this page and save 20%